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Gluten-Free Soft Ginger Molasses Cookies

Ginger molasses cookies on board with one cute open.

These soft ginger molasses cookies make a delicious treat. They are soft, slightly chewy, sweet with a hint of festive spices, and very moreish! Gluten-Free, dairy-free, and Paleo-friendly.

If you are looking to get in the mood for the festive season then why not do some baking? These delicious molasses cookies are so easy to make you can’t really go wrong. Get the kids involved in some festive baking, I’m sure they will love them!

Ginger Molasses Cookies on board with glass jug of milk behind. White background.

The molasses in these ginger cookies helps keep them nice and moist and makes them slightly chewy in the middle. These cookies are somewhere in between a soft gingerbread and the popular Kiwi ginger kisses – without the cream filling.

You won’t miss the cream filling from ginger kisses these molasses cookies are sweet from the molasses and coconut sugar, the warming spices tie in nicely to give these cookies great depth of flavour.

These cookies make great foodie gifts to give to friends and family. If you are looking for other ideas for homemade or edible gifts you can check out these ideas here 30 homemade food gifts that are easy to make.

Additional Recipe Notes

  • You can use any sugar to make these cookies, I prefer to use coconut or rapadura sugar or you could use raw brown sugar, muscovado, or demerara sugar. Brown unrefined sugar works best as it gives a richness to the cookies.
  • You can sprinkle sugar of your choice over the cookies once they are cooked should you desire, or a mix of sugar and cinnamon. If you would rather the “sprinkled” look without the extra sugar then a dusting of almond meal or finely desiccated coconut can work too.
  • If the climate is warm you may need to put the dough in the fridge or even freezer for 5 minutes, this will allow you to roll the dough into balls easier. If it gets too sticky still run your hands under cool water frequently.
  • Once you have rolled the dough into balls you will need to flatten the balls with the back of a glass or a fork.
  • Once cooked the cookies will have cracks on the top – please see photo below. This is normal.
Process shots of cookie dough in balls on baking tray and of cooked ginger molasses cookies on baking tray with cracks on top.

How to store ginger molasses cookies…..

These molasses cookies can be kept for up to 5 days in an airtight container. If you are in a warmer climate then they might be best stored in the fridge. I find recipes with coconut flour stay extra moist when stored in the fridge if the weather is hot. It is looking like we are in for a hot and humid Christmas here in New Zealand ….so we will see!

Other cookie recipes you might like to try:

Cranberry & Cacao Chip Oat Cookies
Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

For more tasty recipes and to see what I’ve been getting up to you can follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest or Twitter.

If you make this spinach, blueberry, avocado and beet salad let me know how you get on in the comments below. You can also tag me #lovefoodnourish on Instagram I love seeing your creations! Hope

Ginger molasses cookies on board with one cute open.

Gluten Free Soft Ginger Molasses Cookies

Yield: 10 cookies
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

These soft and slightly chewy ginger molasses cookies make a delicious easy to bake treat. Gluten-free, dairy-free, Paleo-friendly.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbs coconut oil, melted and cooled
  • 3 Tbs molasses
  • 1 egg at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tp ground nutmeg
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 180C/355F on standard-setting (not fan bake).
  2. In a large bowl or in your food processor lightly whisk the egg.
  3. Next, add the cooled and melted coconut oil, molasses, sugar, and vanilla extract. Mix until combined.
  4. Add the almond meal, coconut flour, baking soda, spices, and a pinch of salt. Mix until combined and you have a dough.
  5. Let the dough rest for a few minutes, if you are in a warmer climate then you might need to cover it and place in the fridge for a few minutes.
  6. Use a cookie scoop or a tablespoon and roll into balls.
  7. Place on a prepared baking tray spacing each ball evenly.
  8. Flatten each ball with the back of a glass or a fork.
  9. Bake for around 10 minutes. Test with a toothpick and it should come out clean with a few crumbs. The cookies will have cracks on the top - this is normal.
  10. Leave to cool for 10 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.
  11. Sprinkle with sugar or choice, icing sugar, or some extra almond meal, or leave as is.
  12. Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Notes

If the climate is warm you may need to put the dough in the fridge or even freezer for 5 minutes, this will allow you to roll the dough into balls easier. If it gets too sticky still run your hands under cool water frequently.

You can use any sugar to make these cookies, I prefer to use coconut or rapadura sugar or you could use raw brown sugar, muscovado, or demerara sugar. Brown unrefined sugar works best as it gives a richness to the cookies.

Nutrition Information
Yield 10 Serving Size 1
Amount Per Serving Calories 151Total Fat 9gSaturated Fat 3gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 6gCholesterol 19mgSodium 151mgCarbohydrates 14gNet Carbohydrates 9gFiber 2gSugar 11gProtein 4g

This nutritional information is an estimate only and is provided as a courtesy to readers. It was auto-generated based on serving size, number of servings, and typical information for the ingredients listed in the recipe card. Please feel free to use your preferred nutrition calculator. Please consult your doctor about any specific dietary requirements.

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